BROADSWORD AND SINGLESTICK PDF

Description About Scottish Broadsword and British Singlestick This book is an introduction to the history, use and context of the Scottish basket-hilted broadsword. As part of the Academy of Historical Arts Study Guide series, it is intended to serve as a study guide for practitioners of historical fencing who work with this weapon, or who would like to begin learning its style. Instructors will also find it helpful as it provides plenty of contextual information to use for illustrating lessons, and anecdotes to help students engage with the system. Contained within is all the information required for self-study of two fascinating disciplines, Scottish broadsword and British singlestick, with salient points for study for people who do not have the luxury of regular access to a teacher. For practitioners who do receive regular tuition, this book will not replace input from your teacher, but will instead supplement it and offer a greater awareness and understanding of the context of the art that you study. Keith Farrell is one of the senior instructors for the Academy of Historical Arts, based in Scotland.

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Weapon[ edit ] The singlestick itself is a slender, round wooden rod, traditionally of ash , with a basket hilt. By the first quarter of the 17th century wasters had become simple clubs known as cudgels with the addition of a sword guard.

When the basket hilt came into general use about twenty five years later, a wicker one was added to the singlestick, replacing the heavy metal hilt of the backsword. The guards, cuts and parries in singlestick play were at first identical with those of backsword play, no thrusts being allowed.

In 16th-century England , hits below the girdle were considered unfair. In the 18th century, all parts of the person became valid targets. These rules are in use today by the Association for Historical Fencing.

Under Kings George I and George II , backsword play with sticks was immensely popular under the names cudgel-play and singlesticking, not only in the cities but in the countryside as well, wrestling being its only rival.

Towards the end of the 18th century the play became very restricted. The players were placed near together, the feet remaining immovable and all strokes being delivered with a whip -like action of the wrist from a high hanging guard, the hand being held above the head.

Blows on any part of the body above the waist were allowed, but all except those aimed at the head were employed only to gain openings, as each bout was decided only by a broken head, i. At first the left hand and arm were used to ward off blows not parried with the stick, but near the close of the 18th century the left hand grasped a scarf tied loosely round the left thigh, the elbow being raised to protect the face.

This kind of single-sticking practically died out during the third quarter of that century, but was revived as weapon training for the sabre within some military and civilian academies, the play being essentially the same as for that weapon. The point was introduced and leg hits were allowed. We have to try to hit as light as possible, but sometimes we hit hard, and today I have a bump over one eye and a swollen wrist. It is very unlikely that Theodore Roosevelt or General Wood ever practiced the British sport of Singlestick but more likely the French art of canne de combat.

Again recent investigation found that most likely singlestick was not present at the Olympics, but rather a form of cane fighting. Singlestick was very seldom taught in late 19th century United States until it was introduced for a short while in Annapolis , and most of the competitors came from academies where singlestick was unknown but French cane was taught. The use of the term "singlestick" in contemporary newspapers explains the confusion as it was an umbrella term at the time to refer to combat sports and games using a stick such as singlestick, cane, quarterstaff or even kendo.

Stickplay with wooden swords as a school for the cutlass remained common in some navies.

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Scottish Broadsword and British Singlestick

Weapon[ edit ] The singlestick itself is a slender, round wooden rod, traditionally of ash , with a basket hilt. By the first quarter of the 17th century wasters had become simple clubs known as cudgels with the addition of a sword guard. When the basket hilt came into general use about twenty five years later, a wicker one was added to the singlestick, replacing the heavy metal hilt of the backsword. The guards, cuts and parries in singlestick play were at first identical with those of backsword play, no thrusts being allowed. In 16th-century England , hits below the girdle were considered unfair. In the 18th century, all parts of the person became valid targets. These rules are in use today by the Association for Historical Fencing.

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Manly Exercises. The Broadsword and Single-Stick.

The instructions in the use of the various weapons are very general and poorly illustrated. However the little book provides an excellent overview of the weapons and styles of fighting covered. To my mind the most valuable portions of the book concern the philosophy of self defense and the proper awareness of the world around you. So far as the weapons are concerned, the different sticks, including the umbrella, are of the most use in the modern world. I have always been an advocate of carrying a good stick appropriate to circumstances. When traveling to places with very restrictive laws concerning firearms even if carrying a badge from another state, my wife and I have always carried walking sticks.

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